Close search
0
If you’re interested in exploring our work we recommend using our intelligent filtering; but if you have something more specific in mind, please go ahead and search above...View Work
If you’re interested in exploring our work we recommend using our intelligent filtering; but if you have something more specific in mind, please go ahead and search above...Use Work Filter
Quay Quarter
Specifications
  • Client
    AMP Capital Investors Limited
  • Location
    AMP Centre Tower, 50 Bridge Street, Sydney
  • Completion
    September 1, 2013 — July 1, 2022
  • Services
    Architecture
Image View

Architecture

Quay Quarter Sydney & Tower

Shaping a sustainable city.

Quay Quarter Sydney is a once-in-a-generation project: an entirely new precinct with a front row seat to Circular Quay. It has set a new bar for adaptable spaces, city-defining places and sustainable skyscrapers. A decade in the making, it’s been a work of collaboration and innovation, with an extraordinary group of partners, including 3XN and Arup.

A vision and a masterplan

Quay Quarter Sydney is a new neighbourhood that includes 33 Alfred Street, Quay Quarter Lanes with its many dynamic bars and restaurants, and the anchor building, Quay Quarter Tower. It represents the transformation of Circular Quay into a pedestrian-friendly public realm and the radical adaptation of a 1970’s building into a 21st century skyscraper.

Creating the masterplan for Quay Quarter Sydney meant rethinking the entire AMP Circular Quay precinct. The vision was a highly activated city neighbourhood that celebrated its heritage and also hosted a contemporary day-night economy.

Two city blocks were to be transformed – one into a contemporary, commercial tower adjacent to the original 1960’s AMP Tower, the other into a mixed-use zone enabling new night life, residence and hospitality.

Performative Pattern

The textured tower façade created by the projection of the sun-shading frame is performing two tasks; the first is to control the high solar radiance on the building, and the second is to reduce the perception of scale of the building mass through the staggered frame alternating direction per block to enhance the individual, stacked block aesthetic.

This passively sustainable technique not only pays homage to Sydney’s skyline marked by the textured façades, but it significantly reduces the mechanical needs of the building while maximizing views for the users.

The tower design is comprised of five twisting volumes, each stacked slightly askew on top of each other, which seeks to break down the scale of the building into five more human scale “vertical villages” and enhance views over the Opera House and Sydney Harbour.
A new laneway has been created in the precinct called Goldsborough Lane, separating 33 Alfred Street from QQT and enabling pedestrians to move through the site and view world class artwork as well as the heritage interpretation installations.
Assembling the neighbourhood

The masterplan gave form to these possibilities. We created a design envelope for an assemblage of new buildings that would make the precinct a world-class showcase of sustainability. And key amongst these, the up-cycled AMP Centre.

Repurposed and upgraded to become an icon of sustainable architecture, it would also punctuate the Macquarie St “spine” of tall buildings, with a truly 21st century landmark.

Under Construction. There are over 30 spiral stairs in QQT. These were engineered and fabricated in Sydney with Icon Metal.

The multi-level atriums provide a sense of synergy between floors. It's the anti-thesis to a typical stacked high-rise. Tenancies are connected though spiral stairs that create a dynamic workplace. And provide moments to enjoy the space and its knock-out harbour views.

Sustainable skyscraper

Quay Quarter Tower sets a new standard for skyscrapers. Proudly 6-star Green Star accredited and WELL Gold certified we’ve delivered a building that defied even the highest expectations. I

The tower retains over 60% of its original core structure. Doing so optimised the embodied energy and resources inherent in the existing building, saving 6.1million tonnes of carbon emissions.

We didn’t stop there. Refinements from top to bottom resulted in sustainability excellence in construction and ensures this will continue in operation. As a result, Quay Quarter Tower is an exemplar of environmentally responsible architecture.

A Flexible workplace

At 50 floors high, the harbour views from inside are unrivalled. Multi-storey atriums with connecting spiral staircases make it one of world’s most spectacular workplaces. But it’s also one of the most flexible.

A de-constructable floor system enables many of the tenancy neighbourhoods to be double-height or more, creating a sense of vast open space even at the very top of the building. And they can change (the
individual pieces can even fit into the lifts!). This adaptability ensures the tower has great leasing flexibility and will keep pace with the changing market.

Some floorplates have a deep, atrium cut on their northern edge to maximize daylight and allowing panoramic views of the harbour and city skyline as well as across a higher number of workspaces.

De-constructable floors slabs within the atrium spaces have provided the client the leasing flexibility and a dynamic varied mix of tenancy sizes to meet occupier needs.

Views at every turn

Playing host to 10,000 people a day, the tower presented a big challenge for pedestrian flow. Our research led to design decisions ranging from the location of lobby doors and escalators, to the complex staging of over 40 lifts in 22 shafts. Walk around Quay Quarter Tower and you’ll be struck by the sight lines – of the harbour, of public art, of gardens, of people. Because despite the technical and environmental complexities this building presented, it’s a place for people.

A place like no other

As Sydneysiders return to the city, they’re discovering a very different Circular Quay. This new precinct and spectacular tower represent a big change to the urban landscape – energetic, inclusive and sustainable.

Quay Quarter Sydney is a bold and optimistic statement about the future of Sydney.

The lobby areas have been developed with London interior designer Tom Dixon. They encompass a double-height lobby, a co-working and conference suite as well as several levels of high-quality retail and lifestyle tenancies.

BVN was the main contractor’s Lead Consultant and the project's Executive Architect. In addition the firm advised AMPC on leasing and workplace strategies. 3XN Architects won the Design Excellence competition and have worked with BVN since 2014.

IMPACT

35,000

Commercial Flights from Sydney-Melbourne – equivalent to conserving 8,000,000 KGs of embodied carbon in retaining the existing structure

35,000

Estimated number of people who have worked on the redevelopment of AMP Centre up to PC in 2022.

68%

and 47 levels of the 1970’s AMP Centre have been retained - QQT is believed the tallest adaptive re-use project in the world.

10,000

People will occupy QQT every day, with an estimated 1million people passing through QQT in the next decade.

The Process

View as Slideshow

Timelapse of the Construction (Jan 2018 – April 2022) – courtesy of Multiplex.

The new tower repurposes the former AMP Centre at 50 Bridge Street, originally built in 1976.

QQT retains 68% of the existing building’s structure and adds 45,000 square metres of new volume onto the north side. The project is believed to the tallest partial-demolition and adaptive re-use in the world.

The sketch illustrates the extent of partial-demolition (orange) and new-build (blue).

It was important to understand the building movement and structural performance during demolition and the gradual re-build stages, as well on completion.

A concept of north tower (steel frame) and south tower (existing concrete frame) was developed to ensure these complex movements were fully understood and how the new-build stitches into the existing – including the new building systems, lifts and the façade ‘wrap’.

A build sequence was developed with Multiplex and the consultant team to solve the complex site logistics and to ensure the new-build seamlessly connects to the existing one.

View of QQT from Circular Quay Rail Station

The Process (Gallery)

Timelapse of the Construction (Jan 2018 – April 2022) – courtesy of Multiplex.

The new tower repurposes the former AMP Centre at 50 Bridge Street, originally built in 1976.

QQT retains 68% of the existing building’s structure and adds 45,000 square metres of new volume onto the north side. The project is believed to the tallest partial-demolition and adaptive re-use in the world.

The sketch illustrates the extent of partial-demolition (orange) and new-build (blue).

It was important to understand the building movement and structural performance during demolition and the gradual re-build stages, as well on completion.

A concept of north tower (steel frame) and south tower (existing concrete frame) was developed to ensure these complex movements were fully understood and how the new-build stitches into the existing – including the new building systems, lifts and the façade ‘wrap’.

A build sequence was developed with Multiplex and the consultant team to solve the complex site logistics and to ensure the new-build seamlessly connects to the existing one.

View of QQT from Circular Quay Rail Station

01 of 07

Credits

BVN
Matthew Blair, Neil Logan, Daniel Cruddace, Matthew Blair, Domino Risch, Susanne Mayer, Jahan Faeghi, Amy Dowse, Ian James, Alan Monckton-Milnes, Max Rosin-Melser, Joe Fiumedinisi, Saskia Arief, Adriana Haindl, Paul Wintour, Amelia Lipa, Byron Sullivan, Farbod Fathalipouri, Daniel Cruddace, Bronte Doherty, Selina Qiu, Rhiannon Macken, Phil Tait, Abbie Galvin, Catherine Skinner, Erika Halim, Phillip Rossington, Gary Cai, Chris Bickerton, Jamie Don, Max Hu, Kathy Hansen, Marc Micuta, Danielle McParland, Michele Di Giorgio, Tobias Fuzi, Alex Harrington, Laurie Aznavoorian, Fabio Oliveira, Jenny Jong, Craig Burns, Mark Gazy, Dinah Zhang, Katherine Wiedersehn, Brian Clohessy, Neil Logan, Barry Dineen, Jonathan Capparelli, Barry Cantor, Alessandra Moschella, Ayelen Moure, Guy Hanson, Shanny Lam, Connor Badenko, Mitch Reed, Benita i Chen, Rhiannon Macken, Louise Barbour, Yashan Chen, Ninotschka Titchkosky
Collaborators

BVN were the main contractor’s Lead Consultant and the project Executive Architect, also advising AMPC on leasing and workplace strategies. 3XN Architects won the Design Excellence competition and have worked with BVN since 2014.

Consultants

3XN Architects, BG&E Engineering, Arup, Group DLA, Morris Goding Accessibility Consulting, Tom Dixon (Design Research Studio), Acoustic Logic, ECJV, Axis, Star Electrical, Precision Fire, Icon Metal, Sharvain, Austral, Foxville, Farra, Greene-Warrington Fire, Maxton Fox

Collaborators

BVN were the main contractor’s Lead Consultant and the project Executive Architect, also advising AMPC on leasing and workplace strategies. 3XN Architects won the Design Excellence competition and have worked with BVN since 2014.

Consultants

3XN Architects, BG&E Engineering, Arup, Group DLA, Morris Goding Accessibility Consulting, Tom Dixon (Design Research Studio), Acoustic Logic, ECJV, Axis, Star Electrical, Precision Fire, Icon Metal, Sharvain, Austral, Foxville, Farra, Greene-Warrington Fire, Maxton Fox

Photography

Martin Siegner

Skyview Aerial – courtesy of Multiplex

Multiplex

Daniel Cruddace

Share
Save
Share
Quay Quarter
Share via:
Or
Copy link...
This page has been added to your custom collection. You now have 0 saved item.View Collection

Related Work

Brisbane
Level 3
12 Creek Street
'The Annex'
QLD 4000
AUS

+ 61 7 3852 2525
brisbane@bvn.com.au

London
Second Home
45–47 Clerkenwell Green
London EC1R 0EB
UK

+ 44 75 4411 7229
london@bvn.com.au

New York
Neuehouse
110 E 25th St
New York
NY 10010
USA

+1 212-273-0440
newyork@bvn.com.au

Sydney
Level 11
255 Pitt St.
NSW 2000
AUS

+ 61 2 8297 7200
sydney@bvn.com.au